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  1. You are gonna cook your setup running 0 degrees of timing, don't do that. On E85 at 17psi you'll find your max power is close to 18 degrees of timing but you need to verify it on the dyno. I run 18.5 degrees on E85 making a touch over 700awkw at 31psi. This is a built motor obviously. Don't go crazy with timing, you can't just add more to make more power, it doesn't work like that. It'll stop making power before it knocks but it will stress the motor a lot more if you keep adding timing. It'll chuck the rods out if you go there. Maybe go back to 12psi and start from there, as it'll pull a lot harder than it is now with the correct timing in it.
    5 points
  2. Nope I think I found the issue. The cam solenoids are super loose in the cam caps for some reason. Wasn't like that when 1st tuned was fine. So it's just bleeding off the oil pressure supply and also noticed sometimes oil pressure does weird fluctuations which I'd assume is that bleeding off also then building back up
    2 points
  3. HPTuners uses a wizard for displaying/building those axis. Because of how they work using interpolation there is often 100s of ways to show exactly the same curve. Ford like to use the least amount of cells as possible to display an axis. Eg if the axis is a straight line between 1000 rpm and 6000 rpm, then you can display this using only two cells. The benefit here is the PCM only has to iterate 2 cells to find the rpm point saving CPU cycles. Sometimes people need more resolution in certain parts, so they modify the breakpoints to add another column, if you do this, then you must rescale all the related tables. We recommend reading this if you haven't already.
    1 point
  4. This will most likely be injector data. I believe what you are experiencing is that while the injector is on the high slope it is all fine. As soon as the injector goes onto the low slope (idle without any load like the A/C or in gear) you get the rich condition. The reason for this not happening on e85 is that e85 uses about 30% more fuel and this would pull the injectors off the low slope all the time. Another confirmation would be that it only does it on 98 at low load like you are experiencing. What you need to concentrate on is the breakpoint and low slopes. if you can post your injector types and data here/get a log of air charge, injector pulse width and, possibly, slope would be sufficient to resolve this issue.
    1 point
  5. Have to wait for 2.00 Appreciate your patience!
    1 point
  6. Have we found a fix for when pressing F2 to change the name / unit doesn't work?? Have tried many different scenarios.. and remembering dlp1 as afr and dlp2 as fuel pressure etc is a little taxing 😆
    1 point
  7. yeah right. makes sense. the code is P0325 - Knock Sensor 1 Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1 or Single Sensor) funny thing is that it only threw the code back up when i returned the knock data/sensitivity back to stock. when i was using my desensitised settings it didnt throw the code.
    1 point
  8. Thanks for the pictures Bill
    1 point
  9. Have a look for an unused 3 pin connector near the other gearbox wiring connectors that matches the Ford speedo transducer. It's usually got a plastic plug in it for protection & is taped to the rest of the loom.
    1 point
  10. Just use your stock timing map and switch off the knock sensors for a good starting point for E85 tuning. When you want to add timing you just highlight 1.0 load to max load at every rpm point and add it there. This makes it easy to remember and also is where it starts getting into boost. Start with a couple of degrees and see how that goes. As far as afr goes you can go plenty lean if you want. I usually aim for 0.82 to 0.84 lambda on E85 as it makes a fair bit more power there than running it at 0.8 lambda. It really depends on how you drive and the weather conditions etc. For a quick hit every now and then in the cooler months, run it leaner cos it'll be fine. Middle of summer and doing a circuit day, you'll want to have it at 0.8 or so to help it cool down. Even if you're tuning and see it go to 13:1 it'll be completely fine to stay in it to log the run, and then add a bit of fuel afterwards. You'll see it lose power on the dyno if you lean it out too much, but that is usually mid 13's so it's clear that more fuel is needed to keep things happy power wise, and also happy heat wise for the engine internals etc.
    1 point
  11. awkw? please tell me its in a territory as to your timing dolan, i try to stay above 5deg, egts will get too much and you'll melt something. what puffwagon said is spot on.
    1 point
  12. Doesn't a turbo flapper mod compensate / correct for this by smoothing out the boost and ironing out random peaks? Short of that, if it's knocking anywhere in the range, isn't that something you can just tune out by pulling timing? Many people run factory NA injectors (and fuel pump) at the same rwkw levels you are chasing without any problems. Also many guys run 7 - 9 pounds no problems. I've seen people complete the conversion, but then be unable to start and run properly with the 4 bar map sensor installed. They had to re-fit the stock one and cruise to a tune shop. I must say I'm disappointed to see an enthusiastic guy willing to learn and with a solid 6 - 12 months to apply to researching, parts / tools collecting etc. join up and ask for advice, only to almost immediately bail out and choose the 'get someone else to do it' path. It's discouraging that this whole scene seems riddled with impossibly steep learning curves and rocket science level equipment. Is it really that hard to install and monitor a wide band + knock sensor + fuel pressure + timing and whatever else? If 12 months of solid research is not enough, why is there any pretence at all to cater for the 'enthusiast' ? This whole thing is made to seem out of reach for all, except those already working with dynos in workshops with decades of prior experience and Space-X level budgets.
    1 point
  13. It's possible the oil feed to the VCT has been damaged or blocked. I've seen it before.
    1 point
  14. You possibly have an oil supply issue then. What pressure are the valve springs?
    1 point
  15. 1.25 has been released and is a maintenance release. These fixes improvements are all in the backend to help us diagnose crashes/bugs and to resolve some specific user experience issues in the custom os wizard Improved error handling that allows some errors to be "ignored" so you can save your data instead of closing the editor. Resolve a freeze in the custom operating system conversion wizard under specific use cases. Disabled the "previous" button in the custom operating system wizard as this could cause customers to reset all their tables without their knowledge. Users will have to create a new custom os using the "start over" button if they wish to create a fresh file. Minor bug fixes and improved performance. If you are experiencing any crashes or bugs that have not been addressed PLEASE file a bug report with us via the link below. If we don't know about it, it is unlikely it will be fixed. https://www.pcmtec.com/contactus In case people are wondering what we are working on, we are now working full time on version 2.xx of the Editor which we are aiming to have complete early next year. This has a massive amount of changes related to Mustang and F150 related support. Included will be all 2015-2020+ 2.3, 3.5 ecoboost and 5.0L v8 for the US, EUR and AUS Market. There are also large scale changes to the datalogging package. This will be discussed in detail when it is released.
    1 point
  16. A few people have asked about Spark so here is a brief explanation of how the ford spark is calculated. The parameter IDs are for BF. FG has more adders as well. The final commanded spark is a combination of multiple tables. This is not an exhaustive list however this is the ones you need to look at. Borderline Knock - auF16593 (this is the maximum spark before the engine will knock) MBT Spark - auF16630 (this is the maximum spark before you stop increasing torque) Coolant temp MBT adjustment - auF2433 Spark ECT Correction - auF0222 This retards timing when your coolant temp gets too hot ECT Correction Multiplier - auF0223 This is a multiplier for the above table. This table can add up to 4 degrees of spark at peak load, make sure you are aware of it. Spark IAT Correction - auF0220 This retards timing when your intake air temp gets too hot IAT Correction Multiplier - auF0221 This is a multiplier for the above table. Spark BLK table adder (lambda correction) - auF0218 - This adds or subtracts timing based on the commanded lambda. This one will catch you out, it makes quite large adjustments based on your commanded lambda, a lot of people zero out the positive numbers in this table. Steady state/cruise This is an approximation of the calculation for when driving under normal circumstances without cold start or deacceleration active. It is an esimation, at some stage we want to make a proper write up on this from exactly what is in the assembly code. This is possibly incorrect or has omissions, so please take this into account. If anyone knows more detail than this please post up any corrections. Final Spark = Math.Min(auF16593 + auF0218 + auF0223 * auF0222 + auF0220 * auF0221, auF16630-auF2433) Or Final Spark = Minimum(BLK + lambda correction + IAT Correction + ECT Correction, MBT-MBT adjustment) IDLE Now if you are at idle it uses a PID loop to control spark. Deacceleration If you are deaccelerating (eg closed throttle) it uses auF0228 (Decel Spark Angle) Cold Start If you are on cold start it uses the following: Maximum Cold Start auF0210 Maximum Cold Start Adder auF0212 Maximum Cold Start Adder #2 auF0211 Cold Start Spark = auF0210 + auF0212 + auF0211 Final Cold Start Spark Max = Math.Min(Cold Start Spark, BLK, MBT-MBT Adjustment) (eg whichever is smaller of the 3 numbers) It will then use the idle feedback algorithm to add/subtract spark to obtain a given rpm. Eg if you have a setpoint of 750rpm and your idle is 700 rpm it will add spark, if it is 800 rpm it will subtract spark. The final figure will be clipped at "Final Cold Start Spark Max" which is calculated above. There is also an "anti stall multiplier" which is added in, most of the time this does nothing unless the rpm dips very low. If you want to datalog final cold start spark max, log the following DMR spk_lold_cld Transient conditions This is when changing the rate of acceleration, eg a change in the rate of load (the derivative of load). For example accelerating slowly, then flattening the throttle. Spark Retard for Tip-In auF0233 Tip in detonation control auF1705 Final Spark Transient = Final Spark (from the above calculation) + auF0233 * auF1705 Torque Control There are various times the PCM will command torque reduction which is achieved by ignition retard and in some conditions ETC (throttle feathering/closing). This is under traction control, changing gears in an automatic etc. Spark Retard (torque ratio) auF0263 Going forward we would like to build a spark simulator. Eg you enter in RPM, Load, IAT and ECT with sliders and you can see what the final spark will likely be, for now you would need to fill out these equations in excel by hand. If you do build anything feel free to post it up, it will be very helpful for others. Why borderline and MBT? Regarding the borderline and MBT tables the reasoning is to achieve maximum timing for performance in all possible conditions. If you use an 120 octane race fuel and find the maximum torque an engine can make then log the spark, this will be your MBT (maximum brake torque) table. Then if you use 91 octane fuel (I think the US fuel is different again) and find the maximum spark the engine can take before knocking this is your borderline knock table. Then you vary the lambda and see how much extra timing the borderline table can take and this creates your lambda spark table. Now this may overlap, eg the borderline knock may be higher than maximum torque. Eg you canrun 50 degrees of timing at cruise however the vehicle will stop making more torque after about 40-45 degrees hence there is no point in running any more. The PCM takes the lowest value of these two tables for this reason. The goal of all these tables and adders is so you can run the absolute maximum timing possible at all temperatures and load. Ford have done a great job of achieving this on a stock calibration, eg the car will run on the ragged edge of knock at all times getting maximum performance and maximum fuel economy (within emissions windows) on 91 fuel. If you were to try and achieve this level of tune in the aftermarket world you would need an engine dyno cell, thousands of litres of fuel and the ability to control ECT and IAT. It would take you a long time, I've been told it takes Ford 3 calibrators 25 weeks to calibrate an engine from scratch. The issue with aftermarket tuning is you do not have the resources to hit each load cell at every single IAT and ECT combination to determine maximum torque and maximum timing. So you compromise and tune the vehicle for the worst case, this means in cold weather/transient conditions you are probably running far less timing than you actually could. Setting the upper loads of the MBT and Borderline tables to be the same figures means you are safe in that you can be guaranteed the PCM will not ever run any more timing than this. It also means at low ECT/IAT temps you will be running less timing and hence less power than is possible.
    1 point
  17. Honestly it all sounds great and I think if you can put the time in it would work. I'd be happy to ask some tuners who might be willing to collect some data for you if you are serious. The only concern is this sounds like a year long PHD project. Do you actually have the time to do this? If you do we will do our best to support you as there are many other applications I can think of that might have a business case behind them if it can be done in a short time period.
    1 point
  18. I've attached a parameter file to this post which has the cold start settings for my territory on e85. The changes are to fuel cranking lambda, fuel base cold and fuel base cold decay. Worth noting is that although I have the decay set to a minute, my tune will switch to closed loop after 30 seconds. I might need to extend it but haven't had a play with it yet. The car started at 8C this morning with the attached settings. E85 cold start settings, fuel cranking lambda, fuel base cold and fuel base cold decay.param
    1 point
  19. Here goes; Column 0 - Throttle % Column 1; 1-2 shift Column 2; 2-3 shift Column 3; 3-4 shift Column 4; 4-3 shift Column 5; 3-2 shift Column 6; 2-1 shift Column 7; TCC unlock 3rd Column 8; TCC lock 3rd Column 9; TCC unlock 4th Column 10; TCC lock 4th Shift Schedule Towing is Performance Mode. The values are a multiplication of gear ratio, not engine RPM. 3rd gear is 1:1 which matches engine RPM. Allow several hundred RPM for shift event to occur, especially in lower gears or an engine which revs quick.
    1 point
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